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Recommended Books

Basic Concepts and Models for Interpreter and Translator Training

The target audience of this book is the practitioners and instructors of conference interpreting and/or translation. Gile argues that professional translation entails students’ understanding of the theoretical approach that translation serves for communication between the initiator and the receptor. He points out that adding or deleting words and reframing sentences do not necessarily violate the principle of fidelity, and that translation must be conducted with discourse comprehension. Gile offers a number of models for simultaneous interpreting, consecutive interpreting, sight translation, and simultaneous with texts, including a sequential model, the effort model of simultaneous interpreting, and the IDRC model (Interpretation-Decision-Resources-Constraints).

Introducing Translation Studies: Theories and Applications

This book is designed as a coursebook for undergraduates and postgraduates in translation studies as well as an introductory book for students, researchers, instructors, and professional translators. There are altogether 12 chapters, covering Jakobson’s classification of translation, the Holmes/Toury conceptual map, the “literal vs. free” translation debate, Eugene Nida’s concepts of equivalence, Newmark’s categories of translation, Koller’s analysis of equivalence, Vinay and Darbelnet’s taxonomy, Catford’s linguistic model, the interpretive model of the Paris School, Bell’s psycholinguistic model, Gutt’s relevance theory, Reiss and Vermeer’s text-type and skopos theory, Nord’s text-linguistic approach, House’s register analysis model, Baker, Hatim and Mason’s discourse-oriented approaches, etc.

The Translation Studies Reader

This reader aims at the audience group of advanced undergraduates, postgraduates, course instructors, and scholars in translation theory and history, as well as practitioners with a theoretical inclination. The reader is divided into 7 sections in a chronological order. While the first section Foundational Statements examines theories before the 1900s, the last section after the 2000s, all the other five sections in the middle looks into theories in the 1900s. Venuti suggests that readers not only read historically, but also thematically. Readers can group together theories with the same themes. Venuti also suggests that readers can use supplementary readings, and further readings are recommended in each section.

Introducing Interpreting Studies

This textbook is designed to provide students, instructors, researchers, and practitioners with an overview of interpreting studies. This book consists of ten chapters organized into three parts. Chapters 1 to 5 make up the synthetic representation of interpreting studies in terms of concepts, developments, approaches, paradigms and models. Chapters 6 to 9 are devoted to an analytical presentation of the state of the art. Chapter 10, the only chapter that constitutes Part 3, reviews the major trends and future perspectives of interpreting studies as a field of research, and offers further suggestions for individual researchers.

The Interpreting Studies Reader

This book is an anthology of texts in the discipline of Interpreting Studies. Part 1 collects works before 1975 that opened the era of conference interpreting. Part 2 collects more works that build up the foundations of conference interpreting during the 1970s. Part 3 focus on works that presents efforts to construct models of the interpreting process in the 1990s. Part 4 covers works from the sociological and situational perspectives as well as the semiotic dimension. Part 5 addresses the discourse studies and pragmatics. Part 6 explores underlying patterns of interpreter performance and its reception by the user. Part 7 focus on non-conference settings of interpreting.

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