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TRA5202 Foundation in English to Chinese Consecutive Interpreting: Home

Course Description

The course will introduce the basic understanding of consecutive interpreting and help students to develop fundamental skills of interpreting from a source language (English) to their native language (Chinese), such as active listening, note-taking, memory retention, delivery and multi-tasking. Various activities including guided individual performance, peer reviews, group discussions and assignments based on speeches and texts used in different situations and for different purposes will assist students to acquire these skills. Students are expected to play an active and central role in these activities.

Recommended Books

Note-Taking for Consecutive Interpreting-A Short Course

This book serves for student interpreters to study the system for note-taking in consecutive interpreting. Part I spreads out the stages through which the note-taking system is built with. Chapters 1-3 present the basic elements of the note-taking system. Chapter 4 starts to discuss how to link these basic elements together. Chapters 5-7 discusses the differing levels of values coming from the speaker, the use of symbols, and memory prompts respectively. Part II provides tips and ideas used within the note-taking system from the perspectives of clauses, rules of abbreviation, verbs, etc. Part III is exercise-oriented, providing sample speeches, their notes and commentaries on these notes, etc.

Basic Concepts and Models for Interpreter and Translator Training

The target audience of this book is the practitioners and instructors of conference interpreting and/or translation. Gile argues that professional translation entails students’ understanding of the theoretical approach that translation serves for communication between the initiator and the receptor. He points out that adding or deleting words and reframing sentences do not necessarily violate the principle of fidelity, and that translation must be conducted with discourse comprehension. Gile offers a number of models for simultaneous interpreting, consecutive interpreting, sight translation, and simultaneous with texts, including a sequential model, the effort model of simultaneous interpreting, and the IDRC model (Interpretation-Decision-Resources-Constraints).

Community Interpreting

This is a comprehensive overview of the field of Community Interpreting. It explores the relationship between research, training and practice, reviewing the main theoretical concepts, describing the main issues surrounding the practice and the training of interpreters, and identifying areas of much needed research in answering those issues. The book is divided into four parts. Part One presents key concepts and research issues. Part Two focuses on practical applications. Part Three discusses main traditions and approaches as well as how to conduct research in community interpreting. Part Four presents further resources in community interpreting.

Community Interpreting (E-book)

This is a comprehensive overview of the field of Community Interpreting. It explores the relationship between research, training and practice, reviewing the main theoretical concepts, describing the main issues surrounding the practice and the training of interpreters, and identifying areas of much needed research in answering those issues. The book is divided into four parts. Part One presents key concepts and research issues. Part Two focuses on practical applications. Part Three discusses main traditions and approaches as well as how to conduct research in community interpreting. Part Four presents further resources in community interpreting.

Conference Interpreting Explained

This book unravels the process of conference interpreting in a descriptive manner. There are 5 chapters in this book. Chapter 1 gives answers of some basic questions such as what is an interpreter, what is conference interpreting, what is consecutive interpreting, and what is simultaneous interpreting, etc. Chapter 2 presents the basic principles of consecutive interpreting- understanding, analyzing, and re-expressing. Chapter 3 expands on note-taking in consecutive interpreting. Chapter 4 mainly focus on simultaneous interpreting, especially the technique of simultaneous interpreting. In Chapter 5, Jones expresses his pleasure with interpreting.

Translating Institutions: An Ethnographic Study of EU Translation

This book outlines a framework for research on translation in institutional settings, using the Finnish translation unit at the European Commission as a case study. It adopts an ethnographic approach to explore the life and work of the translators at the center of this study. This is a study of both texts and people in their institutional habitat. The different methods and data are outlined in independent chapters: the institutional framework of translation, the physical location of the unit, translators’ own views of their role, and a sociologically-oriented text analysis of a sample document.

Introducing Interpreting Studies

This textbook is designed to provide students, instructors, researchers, and practitioners with an overview of interpreting studies. This book consists of ten chapters organized into three parts. Chapters 1 to 5 make up the synthetic representation of interpreting studies in terms of concepts, developments, approaches, paradigms and models. Chapters 6 to 9 are devoted to an analytical presentation of the state of the art. Chapter 10, the only chapter that constitutes Part 3, reviews the major trends and future perspectives of interpreting studies as a field of research, and offers further suggestions for individual researchers.

The Interpreting Studies Reader

This book is an anthology of texts in the discipline of Interpreting Studies. Part 1 collects works before 1975 that opened the era of conference interpreting. Part 2 collects more works that build up the foundations of conference interpreting during the 1970s. Part 3 focus on works that presents efforts to construct models of the interpreting process in the 1990s. Part 4 covers works from the sociological and situational perspectives as well as the semiotic dimension. Part 5 addresses the discourse studies and pragmatics. Part 6 explores underlying patterns of interpreter performance and its reception by the user. Part 7 focus on non-conference settings of interpreting.

Translating for the European Union Institutions

This book is about translation for the European Union institutions. Chapter One explains the legal basis of translation and multilingualism. Chapter 2 summarizes the roles of the EU institutions and the correct (and incorrect) ways to refer to them. Other chapters give information on recruitment, work content, problems frequently encountered, work organization, and the impact of EU enlargement on translation work. The final chapter presents profiles of some translators and places the information provided in the earlier chapters in a real-life context. Annex 1 charts the course of the various Treaties underlying the work of the EU, and Annex 2 contains a brief guide to European Union legislation.

Recommended Databases